Tippie Monday Memoir | Reaching Out in Business

This spring, the Tippie UPO & the Tippie DEI committee are partnering to host a monthly event featuring a different Tippie community member who will tell their story of Who I Am. Storytellers will be faculty, staff, students, and alums.

Our May storytellers represent stories of PRIDE.  All four alumni were involved in Reaching Out in Business!

When: Monday, May 3rd from 12-12:30pm

RSVP here.

Tippie Monday Memoir

This spring, the Tippie UPO & the Tippie DEI committee are partnering to host a monthly event featuring a different Tippie community member who will tell their story of Who I Am. Storytellers will be faculty, staff, students, alums, and community members. Join our monthly zoom call on the first Monday of the month to hear from someone different, ask them questions, and learn together!

Our April storytellers are three amazing Tippie students: McKrina Lopez, Luz Alcala, and Zahra Aalabdulrasul. Join to hear more about their experiences in the BizEdge mentoring program, supporting DEI, and more!

When: Monday, April 5th from 12-12:30p

RSVP here.

LinkedIn Learning March Challenge: Celebrating Women

Did you know you receive free access to LinkedIn Learning as a UI student? LinkedIn Learning is an online training library that provides access to thousands of online courses on productivity, web design, graphic design, photography, programming, coding, and more. All you have to do to get started is log in with your HawkID!

March 8th is International Women’s Day, a global celebration of the social, economic, cultural, and political achievements of women. In some countries, the entire month of March is declared Women’s History Month to highlight the contributions of women to events in history and contemporary society.

This month, to honor women inside and outside of the workplace, LinkedIn Learning has launched a March Challenge, kicking off March 9th. Through short videos throughout the month, you’ll explore gender bias, its impact, and how to support & empower women at work.

Challenge yourself to participate every day –each one takes ~5 minutes or less. To keep yourself on track, try keeping a journal or print the calendar and initial each day when you’ve completed it.

Happy learning!

In one word…What does it mean to be Black in Business?

Black in business

To work with a diverse group of people, you have to first take the time and effort to understand and respect each person on the team and what they bring to the table. During Black History Month, we asked our Black students “What does it mean to be Black in business?” Read their full responses here: https://bit.ly/306v6f3

Posted by Tippie College of Business, University of Iowa on Friday, February 26, 2021

Being Black in Business — Noella Kabula

Meet Noella Kabula. Let’s see what Noella has to say about what it means to be black in business:

“I consider being black in business a journey. Where it has its ups and downs because it can be challenging and difficult to fit in as a minority. At the same time that challenge is necessary because it allows me to step out of my comfort zone and succeed.”

📸: @matt_chia_

See Post on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/p/CLpPljRH5_d/

Being Black in Business — Morgan Conrard

Meet Morgan Conrard. Here are Morgan’s thoughts on what it means to be black in business:

“I’d say creative. You gotta be able to maneuver your way through things. And sometimes that, that means you have to do unorthodox things to get you to where your goals and objectives are. I’ve been blessed for that to be an opportunity and it’s opened a lot of doors for me to pave my way to my goals.”

📸: @matt_chia_

See Post on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/p/CLfCNtdHfMH/

Being Black in Business — Deb Destahun

Meet Deb Destahun. Here are her thoughts on what it means to be black in business:

Unveiled. You have more self-awareness of how people view you and how the skills you maintain and the way you act will be viewed by others. Some people are going to dismiss your qualifications and think you got something just because you are diverse. Using diversity as a scapegoat is a defense mechanism, a veil. It is not my job to correct their rationalization, but at the same time, you can’t help wanting to protect yourself from it.”

📸: @matt_chia_

See Post on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/p/CLZxNs2nk21/

Being Black in Business — Neah Howlett

Meet Neah Howlett. Let’s take a look at what she has to say about what it means to be black in business:

Perseverance. Being Black in business you don’t have a ton of support and you also don’t have a lot of role models to look up to. So it’s kind of like you’re doing it on your own. It’s all worth it in the end though because you know that you will be a role model for another Black student who’s coming into the business world and they need somebody to look up to. And they can say, ‘Hey, if they can do it, I can do it.’”

📸: @matt_chia_

See Post on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/p/CLUqpUln03f/

International Women’s Day: Tippie Monday Memoir

This spring, the Tippie UPO & the Tippie DEI committee are partnering to host a monthly event featuring a different Tippie community member who will tell their story of Who I Am. Storytellers will be faculty, staff, students, alums, and community members. Join our monthly zoom call on the first Monday of the month to hear from someone different, ask them questions, and learn together!

Our March storytellers will honor International Women’s Day!  The Global Engagement Student Advisory Board will host a conversation with two amazing women in business: Yasmina Cassab Mejia and Natalia Gil Lallana.

When: Monday, March 1st from 12-12:30pm

RSVP here.

Being Black in Business — Kethia Mulongo

What does it meant to be black in business? Let’s see what Kethia Mulongo has to say:

Opportunity. Seeing the difference in the room, the lack of black people in the business world. Where I don’t see a lot of people who look like me, who don’t have the same identity. Opening a room or creating a positive thing where you see a lot of black people in the business world. I could use that as an opportunity to create a business for me and for people like me.”

📸: @matt_chia_

See Post on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/p/CLKVN6JnRzG/

Being Black in Business — Lewis Howard

Meet Jacob Lewis Howard. Here is what being black in business means to him:

Adaptable. To be Black in Business you have to choose and wear so many different hats depending on the situation. You can’t take yourself so seriously that you’re seen as aggressive and overly dominant, trying to take over. You can’t be so whimsical and carefree that you’re viewed as lazy. It’s about striking the middle balance, depending on the situation. It’s about being adaptable. To be able to show yourself through your adaptations. Being able to grow a community around you and to adapt to that community.”

📸: @matt_chia_

See Post on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/p/CLFNmBvnaAx/

Being Black in Business — Baaba Saisie

Meet Baaba Saisie, the first of many Tippie students that will be sharing their unfiltered thoughts on what it means to be Black in business. Here is what she has to say:

Inspiring. Being Black in business is inspiring because it encourages people to pursue success in places that seem unattainable.

Courage. It takes courage to be in a field of unfamiliar faces. At times, I feel discouraged by the lack of people I can relate to. It also takes courage to be in a competitive field where my color may be put into account concerning my skills. Despite the challenges, I know that with courage, I can achieve anything despite my skin color.”

📸: @matt_chia_

See Post on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/p/CK1t9UdHu_b/

Black in Business Presents – BIB Talk: Journey to Venture Capital & Investment Banking (featuring Siddig Siddig, Venture Capitalist at Mubadala Ventures)

Please join the Black in Business Series on February 11th  from 2:00-3:00pm CST to hear from Siddig Siddig, Venture Capital Investor at Mubadala.

Siddig Siddig is a Tippie Alum and will speak about his experiences as a person of color navigating his way in the venture capital field. Some of these experiences are transferable to any industry and can help you in your journey in corporate America.

RSVP is required to receive the Zoom link to attend this event. Please fill out the link below to before February 10th.

BIB Talk: Journey to Venture Capital & Investment Banking: https://forms.gle/bK5Qfkc9CAnBb9Vn8

If you have any questions, feel free to contact rawan-taha@uiowa.edu.

 

Individuals with disabilities are encouraged to attend all University of Iowa–sponsored events. If you are a person with a disability who requires a reasonable accommodation in order to participate in this program, please contact Tevin Robbins in advance at 319-335-1037 or tevin-robbins@uiowa.edu.

Being Black in Business

Black in Business

In honor of the unique contributions of Black people in the field of business, during the month of February the Tippie College of Business is sharing stories from currents student and alumni. Learn more: https://bit.ly/3teFNcA

Posted by Tippie College of Business, University of Iowa on Friday, January 29, 2021

In honor of the unique contributions of Black people in the field of business, during the month of February the Tippie College of Business is sharing stories from currents student and alumni.

This project is done in collaboration with the  Black in Business Series Planning Team (Tippie DEI Ambassadors).

Learn more at https://bit.ly/3teFNcA

Tippie Monday Memoir

 

This spring, the Tippie UPO & the Tippie DEI committee are partnering to host a monthly event featuring a different Tippie community member who will tell their story of Who I Am. Storytellers will be faculty, staff, students, and alums.

Join our monthly zoom call on the first Monday of the month to hear from someone different, ask them questions, and learn together!

The first storyteller is Jeffrey Ding.  Jeffrey graduated from the University of Iowa in 2016 after pursuing Economics in Tippie, political science, and Chinese.  He also completed the International Business Certificate.  Jeffrey pursued his graduate studies at the University of Oxford as a Rhodes Scholar.

When: Monday, February 1st from 12-12:30pm

RSVP here.

Forté National Campus to Business Leadership Conference and Women of Color Symposium

 

 

Want to know how your passions transfer to a business career? This Spring, Forté and our partners are pleased to host the virtual National Campus to Business Leadership Conference and Women of Color Symposium.

Glance into a day-in-the-life of successful businesswomen and grow your network to set yourself up for a successful entry into the business world during this premier virtual event for undergraduate women. Pick the session track that works best for you, connect with recruiters from Fortune 500 companies like Citi and JPMorgan, and hear from keynote speakers at DaVita, PIMCO, and more! Plus, you won’t want to miss the keynote from New York Times bestselling author, Lindsey Pollak.

The best part? It’s completely free to apply! Once you’re admitted, a fee is required to reserve your seat. Now is the best time to invest in yourself so apply today!

National Campus to Business Leadership Conference Online Sessions: 
Friday, March 12: Noon – 6:30 PM ET
Saturday, March 13: 10:30 – 3:30 PM ET

Women of Color Symposium Online Session: 
Thursday, March 11: 4:00 – 7:45 PM ET

APPLY NOW
Application Deadline: February 14

Tippie’s Winter Read!

Tippie is excited to launch a new winter break program: Tippie’s Winter Read!

Join together as we read a novel together in the month of January.  The book is Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi. 

Sign up to participate individually or with your student organization!  If you sign up, we’ll send you discussion questions throughout the month of January!

 

 

Homegoing is a novel that will allow us to reflect on history, on family, and on the current Black Lives Matter movement. The book starts in the 1700s and is about the family lineage of two Ghanian sisters. One sister stays in Ghana while the other sister is sold into slavery. Each chapter of the book is about another generation of the family lines: we read about southern plantations, jazz-era Harlem, Ghanian colonization, and more. The book weaves together wisdom through these stories because the author, Gyasi, is in some ways writing part of her story as a Ghanian-American.

Homegoing tackles difficult topics — depicting racism, violence, and demeaning language. Yet, its power is in the truths that it tells through the stories. The books is about 300 pages and was published in 2016.  It has won endless awards and can be found at libraries, online, or at any book store.